Best Savings Rates

| Search for the Best Savings Rates from Banks and Credit Unions
Use our savings rates list below to search for and compare the best savings rates from banks and credit unions. Our list of savings account rates are the highest savings rates around from both local banks and credit unions. We also list the best savings rates from national banks. There is no need to search for savings rates elsewhere since we maintain the best list of rates.
Account Type
Search Type
Sort By
 
Institution
APY
Rate
Min. Deposit
Comments
GE Capital Retail Bank

  (5 out of 5)
Savings
0.950%
04/16/2014
0.950%
$0.00
Great Rates and FDIC Insured 
Barclays

  (5 out of 5)
Savings
0.900%
04/16/2014
0.900%
$0.00
No Minimum Balance. No Monthly Maintenance Fees. FDIC Insured. 
Sallie Mae

  (5 out of 5)
MMA
0.900%
04/16/2014
0.900%
$0.00
Easy Access to Your Funds. FDIC-insured. 
The Palladian PrivateBank

  (4 out of 5)
Savings
0.900%
04/16/2014
0.900%
$10,000.00
Open an account online today at www.palladianprivatebank.com 
Union Federal Savings Bank

  (4 out of 5)
MMA
0.900%
04/16/2014
0.900%
$2,500.00
 
Colorado Federal Savings Bank

  (3 out of 5)
Savings
0.850%
04/16/2014
0.850%
$2,500.00
 
Discover Bank

  (5 out of 5)
Savings
0.850%
04/16/2014
0.850%
$500.00
Grow your savings faster with a rate 5x the National Savings Avg* 
FNBO Direct

  (4 out of 5)
Savings
0.850%
04/16/2014
0.850%
$1.00
Cashback savings where you shop with MyDeals on your check card 
Mutual of Omaha Bank

  (4 out of 5)
MMA
0.850%
04/16/2014
0.850%
$5,000.00
Easy to open, easy to fund, easy to manage. Open an account now. 
First Internet Bank of Indiana

  (4 out of 5)
MMA
0.800%
04/16/2014
0.800%
$100.00
 
ableBanking, a division of Northeast Bank

  (4 out of 5)
MMA
0.800%
04/16/2014
0.800%
$250.00
Plus a .25% bonus EVERY year to give to charity! FDIC insured. 
Bank of Internet USA

  (4 out of 5)
MMA
0.750%
04/16/2014
0.750%
$100.00
FDIC Insured Nationwide Banking 
Discover Bank

  (5 out of 5)
MMA
0.700%
04/16/2014
0.700%
$2,500.00
Easy cash access and always great rates. Open an account today! 
Heartland Bank Direct

  (1 out of 5)
Savings
0.700%
04/16/2014
0.700%
$500.00
Compounds daily, no fees, no minimum, no direct deposit req'd. 
VirtualBank

  (4 out of 5)
MMA
0.650%
04/16/2014
0.650%
$100.00
FDIC Insured 
Bank of Internet USA

  (4 out of 5)
Savings
0.610%
04/16/2014
0.610%
$100.00
High Yield Savings Account, Apply Online Now! FDIC Insured 
AloStar Bank of Commerce

  (4 out of 5)
MMA
0.600%
04/16/2014
0.600%
$1,000.00
 
First Internet Bank of Indiana

  (4 out of 5)
Savings
0.600%
04/16/2014
0.600%
$100.00
 
Lone Star Bank

  (2 out of 5)
MMA
0.600%
04/16/2014
0.600%
$2,500.00
 
AloStar Bank of Commerce

  (4 out of 5)
Savings
0.500%
04/16/2014
0.500%
$50.00
 
California First National Bank

  (5 out of 5)
MMA
0.500%
04/16/2014
0.500%
$5,000.00
 
Lone Star Bank

  (2 out of 5)
Savings
0.500%
04/16/2014
0.500%
$200.00
 
giantbank.com

  (4 out of 5)
MMA
0.500%
04/16/2014
0.500%
$1,000.00
 
EH National Bank

  (2 out of 5)
Savings
0.400%
04/16/2014
0.400%
$1,000.00
 
Intervest National Bank

  (3 out of 5)
Savings
0.300%
04/16/2014
0.300%
$100.00
$500 min bal to avoid fees 
Intervest National Bank

  (3 out of 5)
MMA
0.300%
04/16/2014
0.300%
$2,500.00
 
State Farm Bank

  (4 out of 5)
MMA
0.300%
04/16/2014
0.300%
$1,000.00
 
EH National Bank

  (2 out of 5)
MMA
0.250%
04/16/2014
0.250%
$1,000.00
 
Heritage Bank

  (4 out of 5)
Savings
0.250%
04/16/2014
0.250%
$1,000.00
 
iGObanking.com

  (3 out of 5)
Savings
0.250%
04/16/2014
0.250%
$1.00
60 month CD 2.15 APY*,FDIC insured, open online or by mail. 
E-LOAN

  (4 out of 5)
MMA
0.200%
04/16/2014
0.200%
$5,000.00
No Fees. Start earning interest now! 
Third Federal Savings and Loan

  (4 out of 5)
Savings
0.200%
04/16/2014
0.200%
$25,000.00
 
State Farm Bank

  (4 out of 5)
Savings
0.120%
04/16/2014
0.120%
$100.00
 
American Bank

  (4 out of 5)
Savings
0.100%
04/16/2014
0.100%
$100.00
 
American Bank

  (4 out of 5)
MMA
0.100%
04/16/2014
0.100%
$100.00
 
Fultdirect.com

  (4 out of 5)
MMA
0.100%
04/16/2014
0.100%
$10,000.00
 
USAA

  (5 out of 5)
Savings
0.100%
04/16/2014
0.100%
$25.00
 
USAA

  (5 out of 5)
MMA
0.100%
04/16/2014
0.100%
$10,000.00
 
Astoria Federal Savings

  (3 out of 5)
Savings
0.050%
04/16/2014
0.050%
$500.00
 
Astoria Federal Savings

  (3 out of 5)
MMA
0.050%
04/16/2014
0.050%
$2,500.00
 
Citizens Trust Bank

  (3 out of 5)
MMA
0.050%
04/16/2014
0.050%
$100.00
 
Citizens Trust Bank

  (3 out of 5)
Savings
0.050%
04/16/2014
0.050%
$1,000.00
 

Data Provided by Bankrate.com Rates were collected by Bankrate.com on the dates specified. Rates are subject to change without notice and may vary from branch to branch. Bankrate.com National APY Average and Bankrate.com Site APY Average are only available for MMA products in any denomination exclusively. For Savings products, neither national nor Bankrate APY averages are tabulated. For MMA & Savings products in any denomination, the presented Bankrate.com National APY Average and Bankrate.com Site APY Average are averages of the MMA products only, and are not inclusive of Savings products APY rates.

These quotes are from banks, thrifts, and credit unions, some of whom have paid for a link to their own Web site, where you can find additional information. Bank and thift deposits are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. Credit Union deposits are insured by the National Credit Union Administration. Many institutions have different rates on their own Websites than those posted on Bankrate.com. Please identify yourself as a Bankrate consumer to lenders to ensure you get the Bankrate.com rate. If you believe that you have received an inaccurate quote or are otherwise not satisfied with the services provided to you by the lender you choose, please let us know.

Bankrate.com's Safe & Sound® service provides ratings information on the relative financial strength and stability of U.S. commercial banks, savings institutions and credit unions. Five stars is superior, one star is lowest rated. For more information click here.



The average savings rate is 0.44 percent for account balances of at least $10,000, down from last week’s average rate of 0.45 percent. While average rates declined this week, the best savings account rates remain unchanged.

The best savings rate in our database is more than double the current national average rate at 0.95 percent. We currently have two banks offering a rate of 0.95 percent, GE Capital Retail Bank and CIT Bank. There is no minimum opening balance to earn that rate at CIT Bank.  For GE Capital Retail Bank you need to open an account with a minimum deposit of $25,000.

The highest money market account rate is also unchanged this week at 0.90 percent. We have two banks offering the best MMA rate, Sallie Mae Bank and Union Federal Savings Bank. Sallie Mae doesn’t have a minimum opening balance and Union Federal Savings Bank’s minimum opening deposit is $2,500.

The best savings rates and money market account rates in our database are way above the FDIC’s national average rates. For example, this week the FDIC’s national average savings rate is at 0.06 percent. The top rate in our database is almost 16 times the FDIC national average. The FDIC’s average money market rate this week is only at 0.08 percent. The top MMA rate more than 11 times the FDIC average rate.

Interest rates will be going higher in the coming years as the unemployment rate falls and the inflation rate moves higher. These economic changes will force the Fed’s hand to increase the federal funds rate. Savings rates, money market rates and CD rates are tied to the fed funds rate, so when that rate moves higher, deposit rates will also move higher. Therefore it makes sense to either have your money in variable interest rate accounts, such as savings or money market accounts, or in short term certificates of deposit. You don’t want to lock into a long term CD rate when rates are low. Stick to variable rate accounts or certificates of deposit with terms of 1 year or less. The best CD rates in our database of 1 year CD accounts are at 1.04% with an APY of 1.05%

Top Savings Rates This Week

  • GE Capital Retail Bank Optimizer Plus 0.95% APY
  • CIT Bank 0.95% APY
  • Barclays Bank 0.90% APY
  • GE Capital Retail Bank 0.90%
  • The Palladian PrivateBank 0.90%

Top Money Market Rates This Week

  • Sallie Mae Bank 0.90% APY
  • Union Federal Savings Bank 0.90% APY
  • EverBank 0.86% APY
  • Ally Bank 0.85% APY
  • Mutual of Omaha Bank 0.85% APY

Related Posts:

Best Savings Rates

Search for the Best Savings Rates from Banks and Credit Unions

 
Author: Brian McKay
April 16th, 2014

The highest savings rates and money market rates didn’t increase this month and probably won’t increase much for the rest of 2014. Until the FOMC increases the fed funds rate, which is currently near zero percent, deposit rates will remain near current levels. The FOMC released forecasts for the fed funds rate this month and now only one FOMC participant expects there will be a need to increase the fed funds rate in 2014.

The one participant believes the fed funds rate would need to be increased to 1.00 percent this year. If their projection is correct, savings rates and money market rates would move above 2.00 percent this year. Higher deposit rates sooner than later would be welcome news but don’t count on it this year.

The Federal Open Market Committee’s next meeting is on April 29th and 30th. While the FOMC won’t increase the federal funds rate in this month’s meeting, the FOMC is expected to continue to taper their monthly purchases of long term bonds and mortgage backed securities, slowing their monthly purchases another $10 billion a month down to $45 billion a month starting in May.

This move will force upward pressure on long term bond rates and mortgage rates but won’t affect deposit rates at all. The fed funds rate is the key to higher deposit rates. The smart money is on the FOMC increasing the fed funds rate sometime in 2015. The FOMC’s members’ forecasts have the fed funds rate varying from 0.25 percent to as much as 3.00 percent next year.

A fed funds rate at 0.25 percent won’t send savings rates and other deposit rates much higher than current levels. On the other hand, a fed funds rate at 3.00 percent would send savings rates and money market rates toward 4.00 percent. The best CD rates on 1 year certificates of deposit would be just above 4.00 percent.

FOMC forecasts for the fed funds rate in 2016 is at 0.75 percent on the low end and 4.25 percent on the high end. If the fed funds rate moves to 4.25 percent in 2016, variable interest rate accounts would move above 4.00 percent on average. Some financial institutions would increase variable interest rate accounts above 5.00 percent.

Below is a chart of the FOMC’s participant’s predictions for a higher fed funds rate.

FOMC Projections

Currently, the highest savings account rates are just under 1.00 percent at 0.95 percent and the best money market rate is slightly below at 0.90 percent. Average rates are even lower. This week’s average rate is at 0.46 percent for account balances of last $10,000. The FDIC’s national average rate on savings accounts is even lower at 0.06 percent and at 0.08 percent for money market accounts.

Related Posts:

Best Savings Rates

Search for the Best Savings Rates from Banks and Credit Unions

 

 
Author: Brian McKay
April 10th, 2014

The Federal Reserve wraps up their two day meeting today and is widely expected to reduce their purchases by another $10 billion a month of mortgage-backed securities and long term U.S. Treasuries. A $10 billion reduction would reduce their purchases to $55 billion a month, down from $85 billion a month in 2013. Reducing their monthly purchases will gradually send long term bond rates and mortgage rates higher but won’t increase savings rates.

Savings Rates To Remain Low for Now

Savings account rates, CD rates, and all deposit rates will remain near current levels until the Fed increases the fed funds rate. The current rate is near zero percent and has been at this level since December 2008. The Fed isn’t expected to increase the federal funds rate in this meeting but might change their outlook on when the rate will be increased.

In December 2012, the Fed said that it planned to keep the fed funds rate near zero percent as long as the unemployment rate stayed above 6.5 percent. In December 2013, the Fed changed this policy and said when the 6.5 percent unemployment is breached it shouldn’t be seen as a trigger for a higher fed funds rate.

For many years now, the Fed has said that the fed funds rate will “remain low for quite some time.”  What we’re looking for now is when the Fed will change that language into something that will point to a more finite timeframe. The economy is gaining momentum and the unemployment rate is at 6.7 percent, so that change might happen when the minutes to today’s meeting are released.

Projections for a Higher Federal Funds Rate

A Summary of Economic Projections was released right after the December 2013 meeting and in the predictions a majority of Fed participants forecasted a need to increase the fed funds rate sometime in 2015. Only 2 participants believed there would be a need to increase the rate this year. It will be interesting to see if these projections change at all in the current meeting.

Even if the forecasts are for a higher fed funds rate sooner than later, deposit rates won’t increase until the Fed actually increases the rate. Some banks and credit unions will increase deposit rates in 2014 but overall the majority of financial institutions won’t. Based on the Fed’s current forecasts, we won’t see higher deposit rates until mid 2015.

Average Savings Account Rates

Average savings account rates and money market account rates (account balances of at least $10,000) reported by MonitorBankRates.com are currently at 0.46 percent, unchanged from last week’s average rate. In the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation’s weekly rate survey, average savings rates are at 0.06 percent.

The average rate reported by MonitorBankrates.com of 0.46 percent is derived from rates offered by banks and credit unions listed on our rate table. The FDIC’s national average rate is calculated based on a simple average of rates paid (uses annual percentage yield) by all insured depository institutions and branches for which data are available.

Best Savings Account Rates

The best savings account rates in our database this week remain just under 1.00 percent at 0.95 percent. We have two banks offering savings rates at 0.95 percent, CIT Bank and GE Capital Retail Bank (Optimizer Plus Savings Account).  The second highest savings rate in our database this week is at 0.90 percent from Barclays Bank, GE Capital Retail Bank, and The Palladian PrivateBank.

The third highest savings rate in our database is from Ally Bank at 0.87 percent. The fourth highest rate is from four different banks, GE Capital Retail Bank, Colorado Federal Savings Bank, Discover Bank and, FNBO Direct. These four banks are currently offering savings rates at 0.85 percent.

Best Money Market Account Rates

The best money market account rates in our database are slightly below the best savings rates. The highest money market rate in our database is from Union Federal Savings Bank and Sallie Mae Bank at 0.90 percent. Sallie Mae Sallie Mae Bank is the banking division of the student loan company Sallie Mae.

The second highest money market rate in our database is from EverBank at 0.86 percent. The third best rate this week is from four different banks, Ally Bank, GE Capital Retail Bank, Discover Bank and FNBO Direct. All four banks are offering MMA rates at 0.85 percent. The fourth highest rate this week is from ableBanking, (a division of Northeast Bank) and First Internet Bank of Indiana at 0.80 percent.

 
Author: Brian McKay
March 19th, 2014

Thinking of ways to save money? Instead of focusing on increasing your income to save more, a simple way to have more money is to pay a smaller percentage of your income to taxes. There are several tax advantages designed to encourage saving for retirement which lowers your tax bill by thousands or even tens of thousands of dollars, depending on your income.

Taking advantage of these tax savings plans is a good way to save more money for retirement and pay less to Uncle Sam. The best savings rates currently available are around 1.00 percent, so you’ll have to save starting now and hope for better annual returns in equities to save enough for retirement.

Early last year, I wrote an article that focused on saving for retirement and how a majority of Americans are not saving enough for their golden years. Chances are you fall into the category of Americans who are not saving enough and won’t be able to retire when you would like to.

Majority of Americans are Not Saving Enough to Retire

In a Gallup poll released in 2013, only 19 percent of the people polled believed they will only need to work until their retirement age. A majority of people polled believed they will have to either work past their retirement age or would want to work past their retirement age.

40 percent of those asked about working past their retirement age said they wanted to do so, while 35 percent said they believe they will have to. Working past your retirement age isn’t bad as long as that is your choice but having to work to support yourself instead of retiring is less than ideal. The only way you can possibly avoid this is by planning and saving for retirement.

We will explore 401(k) savings plans and other tax savings plans over the next several weeks. In this article, we will first go over the history of 401(k) savings plans and how they work to save you money. Then we will discuss maximizing your contributions to make sure you are saving as much as you can and lowering your tax bill as much as possible.

History of 401(K) Savings Plans

Chances are that you not only have heard of 401(k) savings plans but that you also have one or more if you have had more than one employer. You are automatically enrolled in any employer’s 401(k) plan and you have to actively opt out if you do not want to participate. Not participating in your employers’ plan would be a big mistake, which you will realize when you read about the benefits outlined below.

Back in 1978, there was a change in a section of the Internal Revenue Code that made 401(k) plans possible. The code change wasn’t actually designed for what we now know of as 401(k) plans today. A couple of years after the code change in ’78, a benefits consultant, Ted Benna, found an obscure provision and figured out that it could be used to create what is widely known as today’s 401(k) plan.

Ted Benna worked for the Johnson Cos at the time and used the law to create a 401(k) plan that allowed full-time employees to fund accounts with pre-tax dollars along with matching employer contributions. Ted Benna asked the IRS to change some proposed rules under the law that ultimately led to 401(k) savings plans.

These plans came about at the perfect time in the early 1980′s when companies were cutting back and eliminating the traditional pension model used for retirement, which ultimately wasn’t sustainable for most companies.

Tax Advantage to 401(k) Savings Plans

Depending on what type of plan your employer has, you can put pre-tax or post-tax money into a 401(k) savings plan but the biggest advantage is the pre-tax plan. This plan allows you to put money into the account before you pay taxes. In other words, you can lower your taxable income by the amount you put into the plan.

There are annual limits on the amount of money that can be placed into a 4o1(k) savings plan. The limit for traditional 401(k) plans is $17,500 (elective deferrals) for 2014 and will probably be increased in the future for cost of living adjustments. If you’re over 50, you can contribute up to $23,000 in 2014. The addition contributions allowed are know as “catch-up contributions,” since at age 50 you are closer to retirement age.

By Deferring Paying Taxes on Your Savings Plan, Contributions and Earnings Ad Up

Say your taxable income is $100,000 this year and you elect to put the maximum allowed amount of $17,500 into your 401(k) plan. Your taxable income is immediately reduced from $100,000 to $82,500. If you’re in a 25 percent tax bracket, you would reduce your tax bill by $4,375 a year at the current maximum contribution. Multiply this tax savings by 20, 30 or 40 years and  the savings add up.

Putting pretax money into a 401(k) savings plan only defers you from paying taxes. Ultimately, when you withdrawal the money in retirement you’ll have to pay taxes. When you reach age 70 ½, there are mandatory withdrawal requirements called “minimum distributions.” The only way to avoid minimum distributions is to continue working past age 70 ½.

Another tax benefit to both pre-tax and post-tax plans is earnings in the account grow tax-deferred. Those earnings include interest, dividends, and capital gains – all grow tax-deferred. Compounding earnings with delayed taxation on gains is probably the biggest benefit to 401(k) plans.

For example, say you have $250,000 in your 401(k) plan and the plan earns a return of 10 percent this year, earning the account $25,000. Since you don’t have to pay taxes on the $25,000 earned, the following year the account has $275,000 in it. A higher amount as opposed to a lesser amount of taxes had to be paid. Compounded over decades, the earnings add up to hundreds of thousands or even millions of dollars, depending on the amount in the account and the returns over the years.

Employers Match 401(k) Savings Plan Contributions

Most employers also will make annual contributions to your 401(k) plan. You are being given free money to save money – this is the best incentive to save and contribute the maximum amount you possibly can to your 401(k). Employer matching contributions differ with each employer but you need make sure you are getting the maximum amount from your employer.

Employer contributions can be in the thousands of dollars, so it would be foolish not to take this “free money.” Your employer might match 50 percent of your total contributions up to a certain amount or even 100 percent of your total contributions up to a certain dollar amount.

Overall Limit on Contributions

As we stated above, there is a maximum amount of $17,500 for elective deferrals in 2014 but there is also an overall contribution limit that are a lot higher. The overall annual contributions to all of your accounts including elective deferrals, employee contributions, employer matching, and discretionary contributions, can be as high as 100% of your compensation or $52,000 for 2014.

If you’re in a position to financially contribute more to your retirement accounts, you should be doing so by taking advantage of overall contribution maximums. There are other creative ways to help save for retirement including using a Health Savings Account (HSA) as another retirement account.

Don’t be part of the 35 percent that want to retire on time but believe they won’t be able to because they are not saving enough.

 
Author: Brian McKay
February 17th, 2014

The best savings rates remain at 1.00 percent and the best money market rates remain at 0.90 percent this week. Don’t expect any big changes in deposit rates anytime in 2014 because of the Federal Open Market Committee’s policies to keep rates low. The FOMC released their statement on monetary policy after concluding their two day meeting. There were no surprises in the statement and no signs of higher deposit rates anytime soon.

FOMC Keeps Federal Funds Rate Near Zero Percent

The FOMC announced on January 29 that the federal funds rate will remain near zero percent and that they would also reduce their monthly purchases by another $10 billion a month. The past two months, the Fed has reduced their purchases of long term bonds and mortgage backed securities (MBS) from $85 billion to $65 billion.

The decision to keep the fed funds rate in a targeted range of zero percent to one quarter percent will keep all deposit rates low. There will be some banks and credit unions increasing their deposit rates to compete with the best rates available but there won’t be any broad increases in rates in 2014.

If the Fed doesn’t increase the fed funds rate, 2014 will mark the sixth consecutive year of low savings rates, money market rates, and CD rates. While it doesn’t look like deposit rates will increase much this year, mortgage rates will be moving higher. As the Fed continues to taper their purchases each month, bond rates will start moving higher and mortgage rates will follow suit.

Bond yields initially declined when the Fed started tapering in January because equity markets plunged on the news. As investors sold equities they bought bonds and when bond prices move higher, bond yields move lower.

Higher Deposit Rates in 2015

CD rates, savings rates, and money market account rates won’t increase unless the unemployment rate falls below 5.5 percent, which is considered maximum employment or if the outlook for long term inflation is higher than 2.5 percent. If the economy strengthens, we might actually hit full employment sometime late in 2014. That’s unlikely, so any major upside in deposit rates won’t come until 2015 when we will may hit full employment.

Only two FOMC members believe there will be a need to increase the fed funds rate in 2014, with one member believing the rate will be increased to 1.25 percent this year. The majority of members have forecasted a need to increase the rate in 2015 which is why deposit rates won’t move higher until then.

This chart shows when Committee members believe there will be a need to increase the rate and where the rate will be.

Fed Funds Rate 2015 and 2016

2.00 Percent Deposit Rates in 2015 Very Possible

The chart about shows an increase in the fed funds rate is likely for 2015 because a majority of Fed members believe there will be a need to increase the rate. Even if there is an increase in the rate, most members believe the rate will still be below 1.00 percent. If this forecast plays out, the highest interest rates on variable rate accounts will be around 2.00 percent. The best CD rates on 1 year certificates of deposit will also be around 2.00 percent.

Deposit rates around 2.00 percent are still not that high when you look back at historical rates, but when you compare 2.00 percent rate to the current rates of 1.00 percent, things start to look better. Below are listed the highest savings rates and money market rates for this week.

Top Possible Rates around 4.50 Percent in 2015

Interest rates are headed higher and 2.00 percent rates are very likely but rates might go even higher. One Fed member believes the fed funds rate will have to be raised to 3.25 percent in 2015, if that happens deposit rates could move as high as 4.50 percent. Obviously, 4.50 percent deposit rates are unlikely unless the economy takes off and inflation becomes a concern for the Fed.

Looking past 2015, it’s more and more likely that deposit rates will move towards 5.00 percent. The last bank I can recall offering a 5.00 percent 1 year CD was Washington Mutual, a bank that was a casualty in the financial crisis. In a desperate move to shore up their deposits they were offering 5 percent 12 month and 13 month CD rates in 2008 when most other banks were offering around 2.50 percent.

Highest Savings Rates

  • First Trade Union Bank Savings Rate 1.00%
  • CIT Bank Savings Rate 0.90%
  • Barclays Bank Savings Rate 0.90%
  • GE Capital Retail Bank Optimizer Plus Savings Rate 0.90%
  • GE Capital Retail Bank Rate 0.90%
  • Ally Bank Savings Rate 0.87%
  • The Palladian Private Bank Savings Rate 0.85%
  • Colorado Federal Savings Bank Savings Rate 0.85%
  • Discover Bank Savings Rate 0.85%

Highest Money Market Rates

  • Sallie Mae Money Market Rate 0.90%
  • Union Federal Savings Bank Rate 0.90%
  • EverBank MMA Rate 0.86%
  • GE Capital Retail Bank Optimizer Plus MMA Rate 0.85%
  • Mutual of Omaha Bank MMA Rate 0.85%
  • First Internet Bank of Indiana Rate 0.80%
  • ableBanking, a division of Northeast Bank 0.80%
  • Bank of Internet USA Rate 0.75%
  • Capital One 360 Rate 0.75%
 
Author: Brian McKay
February 2nd, 2014