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Sorry Savers, Brexit Kills Any More Rate Hikes in 2016

Hopes were high for savers late last year when the Fed increased the fed funds rate for the first time in nearly a decade. The rate hike of 25 basis points in December 2015 was expected to be the first of many hikes to come. In the Fed's economic predictions for 2016, a majority of Fed participants expected four rate hikes in 2016. 

Savers finally had reason to be hopeful that deposit rates would move higher in 2016, then came reality. The second rate hike looked like it would happen during the Fed's March meeting. During the Fed's March meeting, slowing economies worldwide spooked the markets and the Fed declined to raise the fed funds rate.

The Fed also decided not to hike rates during April meeting due to economic uncertainty. June's meeting started to look like another rate hike would come but a disappointing jobs report nixed that increase. A mere 38,000 jobs were created in May, much lower than the forecast of 175,000.

The latest disappointing news that will prevent the Fed from hiking the rate is UK voters voting to leave the European Union. Ben Bernanke, the former Fed Chairman, wrote on his Brookings blog "clearly the Fed and other U.S. policymakers will remain cautious until the effects of the British vote are better sorted out."

There's no telling how long it will take for the ramifications of Brexit to be fully realized but fed fund rate hikes in 2016 are not going to happen. The latest nail in the coffin for rate hikes will leave savers with the same low deposit rates they have been coping with since the financial crisis of 2007/2008.

On a positive note, savings rates and money market rates haven't moved lower since the Brexit vote last Thursday. The same can't be said for U.S. Bond yields. Last Wednesday, 10 year bond yields were at 1.73 percent, yesterday 10 year yields fell to 1.46 percent. Listed below are yesterday's closing bond yields, the best savings rates and money market rates available in our database of rates.

U.S. Bond Yields as of June 28, 2016

  • 1 month 0.25%
  • 3 months 0.26%
  • 6 months 0.35%
  • 1 year 0.45%
  • 2 year 0.61%
  • 3 year 0.71%
  • 5 year 1.00%
  • 7 year 1.26%
  • 10 year 1.46%
  • 20 year 1.82%
  • 30 year 2.27%

Best Savings Rates as of June 28, 2016

  • East Boston Savings Bank 1.07% Yield 1.08%
  • Synchrony Bank 1.04% Yield 1.05%
  • AloStar Bank of Commerce 1.04% Yield 1.05%
  • Goldman Sachs Bank USA 1.04% Yield 1.05%
  • Ally Bank 1.00% Yield 1.00%
  • Barclays Bank 1.00% Yield 1.00%
  • Quorum Federal Credit Union 1.00% Yield 1.00%
  • UFB Direct 1.00% Yield 1.00%
  • Radius Bank 1.00% Yield 1.00%
  • iGObanking.com 1.00% Yield 1.00%

Best Money Market Rates as of June 28, 2016

  • EverBank 1.11% Yield
  • Silvergate Bank 1.10% Yield 1.10%
  • Dime Savings Bank of Williamsburgh 1.09% Yield 1.00%
  • Northeast Bank 1.09% Yield 1.10%
  • iGObanking.com 1.09% Yield 1.10%
  • Capital One 1.00% Yield 1.00%
  • Pacific National Bank 1.00% Yield 1.00%

You can search for a list of the highest savings account rates and money market account rates at any time by searching our rate database at Highest Deposit Rates.

Author: Brian McKay
June 29th, 2016